Chris Juby

Every chapter of the Bible in 140 characters or less.

I summarised the Bible on Twitter between Aug 2010 and Nov 2013 - one tweet per chapter, one chapter per day.

The @biblesummary account peaked at over 30,000 followers, and was featured in the news all over the world.

Find out about the project here, or feel free to get in contact.

Psalm 23 (in 140 characters or less)

The LORD is my shepherd. He leads me in paths of righteousness. I will fear no evil. I will dwell in the house of the LORD forever.

Posted on 21 Dec 2011 to 21,208 followers, with 54 retweets.
Read Psalm 23 in full.

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Comments

Greig Francis

Jesus is the king of Kings

Bob

Yes he is

Kort5

This is definitely a true statement.

Potato

What is love?

ian miller

psalms is AWESOME

GD

@Potato Love is willing & choosing to do that which is best for all parties concerned.

Summary: Contentment & trust lead to abundant blessing.

der derpman

potaetoes are the lord

Joe mama

the potatoes are coming, they are coming...

Micah

Hello, you are so cool.

Why

What does this mean to you?????;

anonoumos

explain more

Carole

Perhaps the most well known of all scripture, memorized by millions of all ages. This Psalm has comforted the dying and the grieving, has been shared in jails with prisoners, preached millions of times in cathedrals and churches and even in gatherings of one or two, put to music and sung by mass choirs, contemporary artists and soloists. Shared with armies, read in the trenches on the battlefield, in hospitals, and possibly the last words of scripture ever heard on this earth by millions.

Amanda

God is great! Yesterday Today and Forever and Ever. Please summarize.

Perusamus Maximus

Great Morals within scripture, perhaps my favourite is 137:9

chrisjuby

@Perusamus Maximus - No doubt there are hard things in Scripture, but if you're reading every verse as moral instruction then you're misunderstanding more than you're understanding!

The verse you mention is from a song sung by the people of Israel after that exact thing had been done to them by the Babylonians. The verse before it says: "Happy is the one who repays you according to what you have done to us."

It's a horrible verse for us to read, but I don't find it hard to imagine how someone in anguish after watching that happen to their people could say, "I'd be glad if the same thing happens to you."

The Psalms contain strong feelings of every kind. The point is not that anyone *should* feel those things, but that if and when you experience those feelings, there is still room for you before God.

Perusamus Maximus

Thanks for the information, it helps give me a better understanding

bleeding bread 9/11

would you say that all psalms have the same value

chrisjuby

@bleeding bread 9/11 Great question!

I think the value of a psalm is the way it helps us to worship God. It's really obvious how that works for some psalms like this one or Psalm 96 or Psalm 121. Almost everyone can relate to the themes of these ones so it makes sense that they're the most popular.

But the more difficult and obscure psalms are vital as well. Maybe not everyone has experienced hopelessness like in Psalm 88 or betrayal by a friend like in Psalm 55 or exile like in Psalm 137, but for anyone who has it's a huge relief to find that Scripture understands what you're going through.

Thomas Green

I believe that everything in the Bible has the same value. It is all just a story that someone made up to make money, IT'S ALL FAKE. Does anyone disagree? If so, how is the Bible real?

chrisjuby

@Perusamus/bleeding bread/Thomas Green
You ask good questions - no need to post all the spam as well. I'll keep removing the spam but I'll leave your questions.

The reliability of the Bible is definitely a question worth asking!

By historical standards we can be very confident in the authenticity of the text we have. Particularly in the case of the New Testament. We have thousands of New Testament manuscripts dating from 1-300 years after they were written. By contrast, for many other classical works we have only a couple of dozen manuscripts sometimes dating from 1000+ years after they were written.

The early Christians were fiercely persecuted in the Roman Empire. They were frequently executed for their beliefs, so there's no way they wrote the New Testament hoping to gain money!

Thomas Green

Thanks for that @chrisjuby but I still believe they wrote the bible for money. They were killed so they couldn't make too much money.

Jane Merry

Jesus is so cool. I wish i could be like him

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